Bastora is a little village nestled in the hills and plains facing Mapusa, the taluka headquarters of Bardez. Covering an area of just 322.1 hectares and having a population of around 4000, the village of Bastora exudes an old-world charm with its stately mansions, pretty cottages, inspiring places of workshop and winding roads enveloped in a canopy of verdant green. Thus abundance of nature’s blessings still exists in one of the smallest villages of Goa.

The name Bastora evolved from the earlier Bastodem of the times of the Kadamba and Vijayanagar dynasties. On the 25 th of November 1510, Afonso de Albuquerque captured the city of Goa, present-day Old Goa. Thirty three years later, in 1543, the Portuguese acquired the territories of Bardez and Salcete. Bastora came under their control till 19 th December 1961.
- Dr.Jaime Rangel



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Bastora comprises a total of 6 wards, namely, Boa Vista, Balbot, Birmottem, Santa Cruz, Xell and Menezes Vaddo/Socol Vaddo. These wards send 7 representatives to the local administrative body, the Village Panchayat. From among these members, the Sarpanch and Deputy Sarpanch are elected. The term of office of the elected representatives to the Village Panchayat is five years. After which fresh elections are held. Under the Panchayat Raj Act, the elections to the Village Panchayat are held on a non- Party basis.


Institutions

ST. CAJETAN’S CHURCH The Parish Church, with St. Cajetan as its patron, was dedicated to Our Lady of Hope (Nossa Senhora de Esperanca). It was initially a Chapel erected by the Provision of 22/11/1752 and was affiliated to and dependent on the St. Elizbeth’s Church at Ucassaim, which encompassed the areas of Ucassaim, Bastora, Punola, Paliem. The Chapel at Bastora was elevated to the status of a Parish Church by the Provision of 01/04/1947, during the tenure of Dom Jose da Costa Nunes, Archbishop-Patriarch. It was consecrated as a Church on the 1st of May 1947 in the presence of Monsignor Tomas de Aquino Barreto, Canon Castilho de Noronha and Monsiger Francisco da Piedade Rebelo, who held charge of the Archdiocese of Goa in the absence of the Archbishop- Patriarch. The Church is built in stone masonry in the Mannerist Neo-Roman Style. The Neo-Roman is a style originating in Italy in the 15th century. Mannerism is a mode of the Neo-Roman in which architects began to express their individual style or “manner”, which did not always conform to the standard rules. Mannerism flourished in Goa between 1550 and 1760. The frontal façade has a miniature template with a niche that holds the statue of St. Cajetan. There are twin bell-towers with the finial in the shape of an obelisk or spear-Head. There is a typical Church Square bounded by the walls which carry the 14 Crosses of the Way of the Cross (Via Sacra).

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ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL was built in 1924. The construction of the Chapel was mainly due to the efforts of Antonio Francisco Soares of Ucassaim. The Chapel was blessed and opened for religious services on 22/09/1925.

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OUR LADY OF PERTUAL SUCCOUR CHAPEL was constructed by V.J. Janin Rangel from Boa Vista, Bastora. It was blessed in April 1927 for private use and the first Mass was celebrated on 11/11/1930. In 1934, the chapel was enlarged and the frontispiece was built. The whole work was completed in 1945.



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SHRI. SATPURUSH BANDESHWAR DEVASTHAN at Boa Vista was constructed in the year 1975 and the founding day was on 2/2/1998. The land for temple was donated by Mr. Arjun S. Pednekar who was a resident of Boa Vista, Bastora


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Cooj Mantal Health Foundation
COOJ Mental Health Foundation (COOJ) is a registered Charitable Trust (Reg. Number 2211/02) that works towards promoting mental health in Goa. Since their inception, they have been tirelessly reaching out to people who have been affected with mental illness or disability. They operate projects under 4 major mental health needs: Psychosocial rehabilitation, Suicide Prevention, Geriatric & Dementia Care and Community Mental Health. As part of their work they run mental health clinic, day care centre, support groups, conduct rural camps, workshops, awareness programmes and a suicide prevention helpline, besides advocating the rights of persons with mental illness at Bastora.